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as st. francis of assistissi showe. it means respecting all creatures and respecting the environment where we live. it means respecting people, showing loving concern for each person, especially children, the elderly, those in need who are often the last we think about. it means caring for one another and our families. husbands and wives. first protect one another and then as parents they can care for their children. and children themselves in time protect their parents. it means building sincere friendships from which we protect one another in trust, respect and goodness. in the end, everything has been entrusted to our protection. and all of us are responsible for it. be protectors of god's gifts. whenever human beings fail to live up to this responsibility. whenever we failed to care for creation, and for our brothers and sisters, the way is open to destruction. and hearts are hardened. tragically in every period in history there are herrods who pluck death, wreak havoc and mar the confidence of men and women. i would like to ask all of those who have positions of responsibility i
. >> hank, you own bank stocks. are you not worried about this? >> no. in fact, in a rising rate environment, as long as rates don't spike up dramatically overnight, in a rising rate environment, banks are going to make more money. >> no, they're not. >> and become even stronger and healthier. and we own two of the highest quality banks in the world, jpmorgan and wells fargo. >> their customers can't -- the borrowers can't afford to pay the higher rates. what's going to happen to the value of the existing collateral when interest rates spike? eventually they're going to spike. the fed has waited far too long to raise them. when they rise they'll rise faster and higher than anyone believes. >> bob pisani, we're not really seeing the impact -- go ahead, jason. >> sure. injury. i'll add in here. i don't fully agree with what your guest is saying here as far as immediately rising rates and banks falling apart. having said that, i think the world has changed and we have to recognize the big picture here. number one, bank business models are not the same they used to be. they're not the great inve
. if you're in creation, environment, ecology will not be lost on this pope. there are other issues in which he can emphasize main line catholic teachings. >> father beck, if you could weigh in on that as well. >> all of those issues you mentioned, women priest, certainly, would be the most unchanged. birth control, 1969, the end result of that was not to listen to a group that was at vatican recommending a change in the church position on that. this pope could have another conversation about birth control if he wanted to. married priesthood. that is a discipline in the catholic church. it's not doctrine. for the first 1,000 years of the church priests married. we have now anglo can priests coming from the anglo can communion into the roman catholic communion. it's being done. there's no reason it can't be done. that is the highest moral barometer, one's countries conscious. >> you said he could but will he based on what we know about him? >> well, again, he has been considered rather conservative with most of these issues thus far. he's already surprised us and broke general tradit
, and we need to really realize that we are still in a very slow growth environment. >> well, robert, let me ask you about earnings and whether or not we are going to see an upset once we start getting the numbers for the first quarter. the s&p capital iq is expecting earnings growth for the s&p 500 of 0.6%, no great shakes, that's for sure. >> i agree with that maria. and i think this has really become a position in the market, where we have had a great run. so you don't necessarily go out there with the broad-based index. you have to look at selective stories to invest your money in right now. the transports, first and foremost to us, were looking a little bit overvalued anyway. but if you break the transports down and you look at a company like csx or a norfolk southern, for example, those companies have continued to hit highs this week, and that's based off of valuation. fedex was a company, in my opinion, that was priced for perfection, they came out and reported lousy earnings and that doesn't surprise me. i think u.p.s. is a much better company. they didn't get hurt nearly as bad.
. capitalism is predicated on unlimited growth, but we live in a finite environment and we seem to have a dysfunctional democracy unable to resolve that contradiction. how do you see climate change and our diminishing natural resources such as fossil fuels and water impacting this crisis in capitalism? >> capitalism is a system geared up to doing three things on the part of business: get more profits, grow your company and get a larger market share. those are the driving bottom line issues. corporations are successful or not if they succeed in getting these objectives met. that's what their boards of directors are chosen to do, that's what their shareholders expect. that's the way the system works. if along the way they have to sacrifice either the well-being of their workers or the well-being of the planet or the environmental conditions, they may feel very bad about it, and i know plenty of them who do. but they have no choice. and they will explain if they're honest that that's the way this system works. so we have despoiled our environment in a classic way. that's why we have huge c
respect for every creature of god and for the environment in which we live. it's protecting people, taking care of everyone, every person, with love. especially children, the elderly, those who are fragile and who often are in the outskirts of our heart. it's taking care of one another in the family. the spouses care -- protect one another another. as children, in times, become protectors of parents. it's living with sincerity, friendships. that are a reciprocal protection in conscience. respect and goodness. in the foundation, in the bottom of everything, everything is trusting the protection of man. it's a responsibility that regards all of us. the protectors of the gifts of god. and when the man responds less to this responsibility, and we don't take care of creation and our brothers, then, there's space for destruction and the heart hardens. in every epoch of history, unfortunately, there are harrods, who create plans of death. they destroy. and make ugly the face of man and woman. i would like to ask, please, to all those who have roles of responsibility, in the economic, political an
certain obligations and i think we're going to have to reassess. the environment has changed. if there's still time far two-state solution we're on the last leg. >> warner: why the last leg? >> israelis and arabs no longer believe in the two-state solution. >> warner: during our recent trip in january, we found many palestinians who've lost belief in the peace process. nasser hantuni owns birds of peace, a pet shop just inside the west bank. he works in site of the security wall israel erected during second palestinian intifada, or uprising, in the early 2000s. >> ( translated ): we feel very frustrated. for the past 20 to 22 years we've had hope in negotiations and yet there are no concrete results on the ground and still we haven't reached peace. all we sue is more settlements, the wall, checkpoints, closures and constraints over the palestinians. 90% of us have lost hope of reaching a peaceful solution with the israelis. >> warner: do you think that there's a possibility that if nothing happens on the peace front more violence will break out? >> it could be, yes. it is a valid alter
is based on female sex appeal and that the job environment is one of joking and innuendo based on female sex appeal. wow. >> by the way, tilted kilt makes hooters look tame. >> kind of crazy. >> where are these tilted kilts? >> i will find the address for you, john i don't think he's coming here monday. you, john i don't think he's coming here monday. ription sleed approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate machinery until at least 4 hours after taking intermezzo and you're fully awake. driving, eating, or engaging in other a
the environment. we don't have the kids on corner fifth of jack dan will itself. >> sewed by businesses and safe businesses, there is no violence here because this is legal but there used to be violence in places like this. violent crime is why america ended 90 years of alcohol prohibition. >> we created organized crime. it organize well before prohibition. >> john: here is the murder rate about 80 years ago, it rose when alcohol was banned and dropped when it was legal again. >> if we want to do away with drug laws and say let adults do what they do, we know statistically the drug usage numbers are going to skyrocket. >> john: but we don't know that. they would think drug abuse would be rampant. portugal did he criminalized all drugs and the number of abusers did not skyrocket. >> people talk about portugals a success, it's actually a blatant failure. >> john: we went to portugal. he is just wrong. this man is portugal's drug czar 15 years ago, hair win users shot up on the streets and instead of doing what we've done they tried something different. they decriminalized every drug. crack, heroin
to reflect the global security environment. the military, and the growing budget, currently the current strategy as well. starting with the strategic guidance issued in january 2012. it seems that we are falling into a trap of creating strategies entirely on how quickly we can cut defense budgets rather than as a result give an honest assessment. i am very much concerned. i always thought that the major mission of the federal government is to protect the homeland. we have to get back to that mentality and recognize the threat and you guys are in the right position to do that. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, senator. admiral? >> chairman, ranking member, members of the committee. thank you very much for taking time to hear from myself, general jacoby and general kelly. i always say that i feel safe when i'm with a big marine general and a big army general. it is probably the safest and i could be up your wet. thank you for having us and putting us together for this panel. as the chairman mentioned, rounding out for years in my current position. before that i was lucky enough to b
. it addresses the need for a national military strategy to reflect the global security environment. the military, and the growing budget, currently the current strategy as well. starting with the strategic guidance issued in january 2012. it seems that we are falling into a trap of creating strategies entirely on how quickly we can cut defense budgets rather than as a result give an honest assessment. i am very much concerned. i always thought that the major mission of the federal government is to protect the homeland. we have to get back to that mentality and recognize the threat and you guys are in the right position to do that. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, senator. admiral? >> chairman, ranking member, members of the committee. thank you very much for taking time to hear from myself, general jacoby and general kelly. i always say that i feel safe when i'm with a big marine general and a big army general. it is probably the safest and i could be up your wet. thank you for having us and putting us together for this panel. as the chairman mentioned, rounding out for years in my curren
and large it hurts people. it hurts the environment. it takes from the poor gives to the rich. >> it is not true. business has lifted more people out of poverty in the last 200 years than anything that ever existed. business is a great value coordinator. the intellectuals they captured the naturety. that's greedy exploit tate tive and that narrative needs to be challenged and changed. >> your book is called conscious capitalism meaning most of the people in business aren't conscious of -- >> apparently not. they are not conscious of the great value they are creating. they are always on the offensive not able to articulate why business is good and how it is making the world a better place. >> what you are doing with whole foods some call it lefty silly feel good nonsense. what does it have to do with conscious capitalism. you sold people on whole foods as if it was better. >> no one is forced to trade with our company. there is competitive alternatives in the marketplace. they believe they are getting value and exchange. >> you have questions or comments from john mackey please
will be multiple expansion. we're selling 13 and a half, 14 times 2013 earnings. in a low interest-rate environment that is very cheap. we can easily get up to 15, 16, even 17 and not be out of line with historical experience. i think it is multiple expansion that is going to be the key because, again, we know there are $10 trillion in money funds or in bank accounts earning nothing. people are eventually going to say, hey, i am going to go get some of that dividend income. i am going to move back. it has only been done little but so far. we could see a much bigger movement and one that i think is fully justified by the fundamentals behind the market. david: are you surprised more money has not come out of the bond fund? there has been a lot of money going into stock fund, but there has not been a big drop-off, frankly not at all, of money in bond funds. why not? >> i think, again, a lot of people cling to the bond funds because if their is a crisis, like we saw in greece, the treasury market possible little bit. if you hold treasury's you can look at those and say, that cushioned the decline in th
an environment where people thought the u.s. economy was done forever, we had a wonderful bull market appear out of no where. >> reporter: and all those nest eggs? the recession shung the average 401(k) from a high of $67,000 in 2007 to over $46,000 in 2009. but that average has rebounded to more than $77,000 in 2012. experts say that every day americans like the walters got it right. leaving their 401(k) intact riding out the market swings. as painful as that can be. would you suggest that people just not pay attention to the number every day? so many people do. >> absolutely not. for a 10, 20 year, 401(k). stay in the market long term. you should be fine. >>> at least two people have died after their plane crashed into a south bend, indiana neighborhood. the small jet was experiencing mechanical problems as it tried to land at the nearby airport. it hit two homes and then became stuck inside of a third house. investigators believe everyone on the ground, though, did survive. >> i was outside grilling on the grill. i looked up heard some engine noise. the plane was right over our house at that
that in the coming months. but let's be honest about it, it's a difficult environment because you have a very, very locked in, particularly in the house, a very locked in republican majority that is resistant to any kind of new revenues to help solve the problem. >> david axelrod, sir, thank you so much for joining us this afternoon. >> always good to be with you, martin. >>> next, the supreme court hears another case aimed at restricting voting rights. stay with us. >> is he right that we don't have an immediate crisis? >> we do not have an immediate debt crisis, but we all know that we have one looming. >> so you agree with the president on that? >> the american -- yes. ♪ baby, baby don't leave me we've all had those moments. when you lost the thing you can't believe you lost. when what you just bought, just broke. or when you have a little trouble a long way from home... as an american express cardmember you can expect some help. but what you might not expect, is you can get all this with a prepaid card. spends like cash. feels like membership. [ dog barking ] ♪ [ female announcer ] life is
of ceos talking about the lack of clarity in the global environment. i know a lot of the digital marketing dollars right now are based in the u.s. but these numbers seem pretty bullish to me. do you feel better or more cautious than last quarter when you look out at the rest of the year from here? >> jon, i think the macro trend is more spend is going to go digital. and when people talk about big data, we're the big data company for marketers. so as you talk about the hundreds of billions of dollars, where people are going to want to know what the return of investment is, there is no other company that's as well positioned as adobe, to really let them know how to spend that money and to accurately reflect what the return of investment is. so we think that the macro trends will fuel this business for many years. >> so what would be an appropriate growth -- yes, what would be an appropriate growth rate, then, for adobe? obviously, your stock is trading higher in the extended hours. a lot of people very pleased with the earnings results that we saw. is this sustainable, this year and next? wh
know that makes a difference. but for the law enforcement officers going into that environment, having to deal with someone with a 30, 40, 50-round magazine, that puts them in needless harm's way. so by eliminating that capacity, people still have the right to fire those weapons. we just have a better opportunity, a better chance, to really neutralize that threat. >> chief gaudett, you live in newtown, i believe. >> i do. >> the argument -- you would have heard this many times -- is that any attempt to prohibit the sale of ar-15s, one of the most popular rifles in the country, is an assault on the second amendment rights of americans. what do you say to that? >> i respect the second amendment. i believe that people should have the right to own weapons. i think that the assault weapon in particular is a weapon of war. and i don't believe necessarily that anyone, other than police or military, should own a weapon like that. it puts my people in danger and great jeopardy. it puts the citizenry in great jeopardy. i reject the notion that it's a hunting rifle, a sporting rifle. i believe it
motives making it impossible for compromise to occur or produce an environment where people of different parties can talk to each other so we talk more and get common ground at the end of the day. time will tell. i am hopeful. >> if there's no deal by end of july, early august, will you vote to raise the debt ceiling? that's when it has to be raised. >> i think it will come down to all of that. i am not getting into what we will or will not do. i believe we can make sure default is not going to happen. i am not worried about us defaulting. i think we can get the authority from the president to prevent default from happening. but i have to tell you, wolf, we can't keep running up deficits like this. it will damage the economy deeply. people say we don't have a crisis on the horizon, of course we do. we have a debt on a tear. if the debt takes off like it is projected to do so, it is not only hurting our economy today, it is destroying it for the next generation. we can't sit around and be complicit with that. the problem is we have to do something about that. >> one final question. senato
again. >> she walked quite a distance in a very, very threatening environment. it's very black out here, very dark. it's very steep. it is brushy. there is also coyotes in the background. >> amazing. the girl had to climb 200 feet embankments before finding help at a rail station. sadly, paramedics found her father dead when they arrived at the accident scene. >> what a story. >>> listen to this one. a bizarre freak accident stunned a quiet neighborhood near los angeles. a glendale couple lost control of their car ended up on the roof of a neighbor's house. the driver and his wife say they drove down a hill. they couldn't stop the car. it turned the corner. when the car went airborne and landed on the roof amazingly no one was hurt. emergency crews needed a crane to remove the car. oops. >> amazing. >>> a wild finish to a nascar race in california driver denny hamlin in the number 11 car and number 22, joey logano were battling for the lead in the last lap. logano hit the wall. hamlin ended up slamming into an infield wall. he was stretched off and flown to a hospital. his team says he
for in this type of environment. >> there is someone here to see you. >> let him in. >> he is a detective. he is here assisting, this couple, luke and laura, and helping them. >> this couple luke and laura. >> this couple luke and laura. they're like the big. >> yeah, sorry, yeah, yeah, yeah. >> luke and laura are soap legends after all. elizabeth taylor was a legend too who appeared on "gh" in the early '80s. rick remembers her well. >> doing a scene with elizabeth taylor, walking off arm in arm, the camera fades to black. she goes "acting is so stupid." >> so, i will tell you what. >> tell me. >> a lot of soap operas are leaving because nobody is watching. union of the young people are watching. i started watching soap operas a year ago. i am hooked on "general hospital." i can't wait. >> the rage in 1981. >> you would know because? >> i remember all this. a freshman in high school. all the girls talked about. >> you never watched. >> dr. drake. >> you never watched. >> not really. unless i was with them trying to get on their good side. >> there you go. g to get on their good side. >> ther
in the u.s. we have to have austerity. >> fiscal austerity only works in environments of high inflation. we need to focus on the future. focus on austerity. dennis: the government is spending too much. this is not a good thing. >> you need to regain balance over time. right now, trying to get through immediately in the united states could really put a drag on growth here. with 7.7% unemployment, we need growth. dennis: it seems like all the folks in washington when they talk about growth, they talk more about growth and tax revenue and growth and the economy. >> right now, not only the united states, but particularly europe, there is not enough focus on reform. we need to make the changes and make it easier for businesses to conduct business. dennis: packs and retitle it reform is what we need. >> absolutely. clarity about a bath for sure prosperity. dennis: thank you for being with us. peter henry. thank you. take care. cheryl: fewer americans are expecting a financial boost from their tax refund this year. 59% of people are expecting that coveted refund check that averaged $2700. 28% are
the environment and the poorest and the weakest. cansaid a little tenderness open up a horizon of hope. >> 34 years ago we began providing televised access to congress and the every day workings of the government. c-span, created in 1979 by america's cable companies and brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> the winners have been selected in this year's c-span's studentcam documentary competition on the theme "your message to the president.'' the grand prize winner was josh. first prize for his work on the economy and spending. one person prize with a documentary on transportation along with two other boys. see all the videos on our website. >> "washington journal" continues. host: merideth shiner is a staff writer for roll call. here's a headline from a recent piece -- are sixhere subcommittees and of those, three of them are not shared by women. threedition to those p chaired by women, three of them subcommittee is chaired by women. given the history of women in politics, it's a pretty remarkable thing. the other thing they are doing, they're not just coming to t
. >> how can you speculate how president reagan would react in today's environment? i think milltail things have changed. hal: if policies any indication, he'd be a democratic, because he'd have to change parties after he was primaried as a republican. jacki: because he was too moderate. the nature of warfare that ha changed, too. hal: george is talking out of his posterior. you can tell with the conversion from benghazi to reagan. jacki: a cooling gel might be good for that. hal: i would say to george before he calls back in and tries on another show or either on this one to push that as a paired example of presidential egregious behavior to read up on history. there are plenty of sites out there right and left where you can look at the time line leading up to the iraq war look at the pictures of abu graib. it was not the only one simply the one where the pictures came from, and the ridiculous arc of associating those with it things is like saying that the first bombing of the world trade center is equal to the second bombing of the world trade center and pearl harbor, they are all the sam
rate environment. >>> u.s. equities had been a little bit waerbg. they have been preparing their losses through the morning. dow futures only 11.5 points below fair value. we've been watching what happened overseas in asia. the nikkei was up 1 1/3. in europe, red arrows because of economic numbers. also concerns continuing about cyprus. the cac is done 1.1%. we have positive comments made by fed chairman ben bernanke. >> we'll use models and other indicators and the state of the labor market to try to make a good estimate how much we need to change the rate of flow. but, again, the point is to let the markets see our behavior, to let them see how we respond to changes in the market. and higher levels of purchases or the ultimate facing out of the program. >> in other words, it's not going to be spigot on, spigot off. rick is the head of strategy at wells fargo securities. rick, thank you for joining us this morning. >> thanks for having me. >> you have been right on some big calls in the past. you called it right almost to the day back in march of 2009. >> yeah. >> for the bottom. >> yo
, and epa, our corporations are putting more chemicals into our environment and into our food, making us sick. chemicals are chemicals. we have got to get our own -- this is democrats in indiana. caller: good morning. thank you for having me on. with president obama going to israel, the point i don't get still, what about the palestinians? is a separateic topic. this is u.s. policy towards syria. what do you think should be u.s. policy towards syria? caller: right now, i don't think we should be the police of the world. --should work to resolve this is an internal issue in syria. if he goes over the border, we should look into it. but we should deal not by ourselves but through other nations, the other arab nations. that is what they are there for. i am not quick about sending our troops to get killed and another war again. here john is a republican in the suburbs and alexandra, virginia. caller: good morning, thank you for taking my call. in regard to u.s. involvement in the commander testified to the senate last week or two is toogo that it propagated, the situation in we don't terms o
in an environment that can be only described as alice in wonder land, how does the fed managing interest rates play into the interpretation of your survey. or does it at all in your opinion? >> well, i'm not sure if they do look at our survey or not. the reading i would take away is more and more are of the view they may start tweaking with the bond buying program. >> now from my perspective. let me make an assumption. let me say in my opinion i don't think they're going to pull back in a big way any time soon from some of these programs. so i guess the question i'm going to ask you this, is the bearish news showing up in con treat terms, not just opinion in your survey, should the interest rates remain tame and they actually have been dropping, what you are saying is that this could be a contrary indicator that's big out there. it can create a spiral where they need to run in and buy futures if rates start to drop. could that not be true as well? >> well, rick, i think you're right in thinking that is a possibility. we don't know for issue if this is a contrary reader or not. if you have reasons t
-- >> is there -- how much is the business environment of the city and how much of the decisions being mid at the margin by whether it is wealthy people or people coming up businesses or somewhere else, how much is that affected? what tipping point is there when things like in positions and mandates like paid sick leave or higher taxes push people over that marginal line and decide not to open -- >> decree eighting opportunity, creating that path to the middle class of new york city, only helps create a stronger city. what you are seeing is new york city being made weaker. as we saw by the grass. the exodus of middle income workers. that's killing the city. middle mcindividuaclass individ backbone of the city. drying up bit by bit. s it is better to be the people of the city of new york. >> we have policies that make it attractive to come to new york. new york city is always going to be a best nation for people from around the country, around the world. and we have to make it's easier for not only businesses and no only the big companies, but the mom and pops. i have called for the elimination of some o
are looking at that environment and saying it just doesn't work at the very top if we also want to have children. and so what we have to do is change the structures of the work force. we have got to say to our companies -- and i think this is the biggest feminist revolution. if we can change the shape of that border and table to make it more family friendly and implement more flexible work programs and have careers up and down uncan dial up and dial back again at certain stages. actually those companies find the productivity increases. the companies that say to women and to men we don't care about your input. we care about your output. where and when you work for doesn't matter but what you do produce matters. that works so well for women. in those circumstances, productivity rises for the company and you keep women in the work force. >> i venture to say we might be more productive when we have small children because we're on fire and trying to keep it all going and we are not checked out. every argument made here at the table is valid and i think the bigger point here, whether it's the
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)